Stampin’ Up!’s Craft Ink – Wonderful Ideas

As you look through the Stampin’ Up! Catalog, you will see a huge list of ink pads – 6 color families (60 individual colors)  – 2 different ink types – Classic and Craft…  The ink pads are wonderful… when stored the ink pad is actually upside down and when you open the ink pad, the ink is always at the top of the pad – making it extremely easy to stamp with.

Many of you have wondered what is the difference between the classic ink pads and the craft ink pads…

  • Classic Ink is dye based ink and mainly used for stamping cards/stationary and will fade over time but dries relatively quickly.  It is not waterproof when it dries.
  • Craft Ink is pigment ink and is much thicker and robust in color and will not fade over time but takes longer to dry… It is waterproof when it dries… It is the choice of Scrapbook Enthusiasts.

With the Craft Ink’s Robustness in color, you can simply stamp over multiple colors and have a really neat effect that you would not get with the Classic Ink Pad’s.

Here’s some really nifty ideas on using the Craft Ink:

  • Use for stamping beautiful designs on scrapbook pages and journals.
  • Use them to coat Stampin’ Up!’s chipboard.
  • Stamp with craft ink, then sprinkle with clear embossing powder and emboss. It is like having embossing powder in all the Stampin’ Up! colors. (for a more special effect try irredesent ice embossing powder on top of the craft ink!)
  • Use Soft Subtles color family to stamp on basic black cardstock for a chalkboard effect.
  • Use them for decorating – making curtains, tablecloths, lampshades and napkins!  (how cool is that?) (make sure to heat set and launder separately the first time!)
  • Use the earth elements close to cocoa or creamy carmel colors to cover a piece of cardstock then use sandpaper to rub off the color a bit for an antique effect…
  • Dip head of brad in the desired color of craft ink and then dip in clear embossing powder and heat. Now your brads match your paper perfectly.
  • Stamp on ceramic tiles for a wonderful set of coasters or decorative tiles for the kitchen!
  • Use them for watercoloring with a blender pen the stamped images… it has a more vibrant watercolor effect than the classic ink pads.

Still Not Sure?

  • Try the Stampin’ Spots first – you get a lot of color for a great price!

Copyright 2007 Stampaloooza Paper Art Studios

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2 Comments

  1. July 19, 2007 at 6:04 am

    Here’s directions to use craft ink to stamp on fabric:
    Remember: Darker colors will stand the test of time better.

    Step 1. Wash the fabric first using NO fabric softener
    Step 2. Hold your stamp down for a few seconds so the ink “soaks” into the fabric
    Step 3. Let it air dry for roughly 24 hours
    Step 4. Turn it inside out (don’t forget this step! Don’t Ask! At least the cat did not do this blunder…) and throw it in the dryer for 30 minutes to heat set it or you could simply iron it… but I have had more success with dryer heat set.
    Step 5. To wash/launder the stamped item: use the coldest water possible, and if you let it air dry, the colors will last longer. Also using the detergent Cheer works very well to preserve colors.

  2. Andrea heinz said,

    July 31, 2007 at 12:13 pm

    I just tried this one some onsies. They look cute but this was my first try so I didn’t get a full stamp on all of them. I should have made sure it was coated well. But it gave a nice heathered vintage look so I am happy with it. I have them in the dryer now. I will post again once I wash them and see how it turns out. Thanks for posting these directions!


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